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Fulbright Scholar-in-Residence leads discussion on climate change and water conservation

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North Central welcomes its fifth Fulbright Scholar-in-Residence, Radha Rajagopalan from Toronto, Canada. Her strong interest in global climate change and water conservation complements the College’s 2009-2010 international and cultural focus on global environmental change. As part of her yearlong stay at North Central, Rajagopalan has been co-teaching an English 125 course titled Thirsty Cities during fall term and will teach a seminar of her own design, From Policy to Action: Managing Urban Climate Change, during spring term. Throughout winter term when she’s not teaching a specific course, Rajagopalan will give community-wide lectures on Canadian culture and climate change issues. She is also helping organize a symposium, titled The Ripple Effect, in conjunction with the Office of International Programs and the College’s focus on global environmental change. The symposium will take place in the spring and bring together speakers at the national, regional, state and local levels to talk about current water issues. Rajagopalan is a senior research analyst in Toronto’s Environment Office and has been involved in drafting and implementing Toronto’s Climate Change, Clean Air and Sustainable Energy Action Plan and led efforts to revamp the city’s green purchasing policy, which is being adopted by other corporations in Toronto. She’s also designed and implemented public educational and grant programs around climate change and global warming, social responsibility programs for the corporate sector, and worked to develop a Canada-United States coalition to protect the Great Lakes watershed. Rajagopalan’s role as North Central’s Fulbright Scholar-in-Residence gives her an opportunity to initiate a dialog around environmental issues with students, faculty and the Naperville community and encourage discussion and collaboration among people in Canada and the United States.