North Central College - Naperville, IL

College offers 11 Verandah experiences during D-Term

College offers 11 Verandah experiences during D-Term

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It’s time for students to sign up for D-Term’s Verandah courses. These informal learning experiences connect students and faculty outside the framework of the traditional classroom in workshops or activities and provide creative opportunities for students’ personal and academic development.


A Culture of Inquiry

One of the key goals of North Central College’s 2007-2012 Strategic Plan is to foster “a culture of inquiry” in which intellectually ambitious students can advance as far as their motivation and curiosity will take them.

Commencement 2009

“To ‘Be a Builder’ also means this: don’t ever be satisfied. Look at the world and see how you can improve it — in other words, ‘Be A Critic.’”
-Blair Kamin, Commencement Speaker

Richard M. Eastman, Alumni and friends share four decades of memories, North Central NOW Fall 2009

North Central College lost legendary teacher and academic visionary Richard Morse Eastman (H) ’93, professor of English emeritus, on June 17, 2009. He died at his longtime Naperville home at age 92.

After his 36-year career as a professor and dean and vice president of academic affairs, Eastman’s influence continues to be acknowledged by countless alumni who, under his dedicated tutelage, became better writers, readers, speakers and thespians. Many give him direct credit for their successful careers.

A Legacy of Science-Mildred Rebstock

From the science labs of Goldspohn Hall in the early 1940s came a scientist who was featured in Time magazine and honored in Washington D.C. Dr. Mildred Rebstock was given much of the credit for finding a synthetic form of chloromycetin. At the time, antibiotics had to be grown slowly from molds and the rarity of chloromycetin (discovered in 1947) limited its widespread use in combating diseases like typhoid fever and Rocky Mountain spotted fever. That changed with Rebstock’s discovery in 1949.

Leadership, Ethics & Values: An Enduring Mission

It has been 20 years since North Central College President Gael Swing announced a “distinctive new program,” designed to “help train not only tomorrow’s leaders, but to help present-day decision-makers as well.” He called it “Leadership, Ethics and Values” (LEV), noting that “the program may be new, but the concept is an outgrowth of our heritage and our mission—to provide a liberal arts education designed to prepare students to live free, ethically responsible and intellectually rewarding lives.”

A Legacy of Science: College shapes vision for a 21st century science facility

For a college which numbers among its graduates many nationally and internationally recognized doctors, scientists, engineers and teachers of science, it’s hard to believe that four decades ago the future of science at North Central College was very much in doubt. The merger of the Evangelical United Brethren (EUB) and Methodist churches in 1968 dramatically affected the EUB church’s historic role in supplying North Central with students and financial support.

Peace corps volunteer finds familiar issues in new culture

Unemployment makes the news nearly every day, but Emily MacGruder ’06 is tackling the issue in a country that doesn’t make the evening news: Tonga. Assigned to the island nation in 2007 through the Peace Corps, MacGruder works with the Ministry of Training, Employment, Youth and Sports to help unemployed Tongans.

Teaching Those Who Teach

“It’s always about the kids and it’s always been about the kids.”

That philosophy is the inspiration for Nick Guido ’09, who spent fall term student-teaching social science and history at Oswego High School. “That was the philosophy of my speech teacher in high school and it inspires me now,” says Guido. “I want to make every effort to make my passion for history come alive for my students, so they can experience what I feel. Since high school I could picture myself in front of my students.”

Inspired Partnership, Inspiring Stories

Eric Knox was a fourth grader growing up on Chicago’s West Side in the late 1980s the day some North Central College students showed up at his school. The students were there to tutor pupils at James Weldon Johnson Elementary School in Chicago’s North Lawndale neighborhood.

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