North Central College - Naperville, IL

A Legacy of Science-Mildred Rebstock

From the science labs of Goldspohn Hall in the early 1940s came a scientist who was featured in Time magazine and honored in Washington D.C. Dr. Mildred Rebstock was given much of the credit for finding a synthetic form of chloromycetin. At the time, antibiotics had to be grown slowly from molds and the rarity of chloromycetin (discovered in 1947) limited its widespread use in combating diseases like typhoid fever and Rocky Mountain spotted fever. That changed with Rebstock’s discovery in 1949.

A Legacy of Science: College shapes vision for a 21st century science facility

For a college which numbers among its graduates many nationally and internationally recognized doctors, scientists, engineers and teachers of science, it’s hard to believe that four decades ago the future of science at North Central College was very much in doubt. The merger of the Evangelical United Brethren (EUB) and Methodist churches in 1968 dramatically affected the EUB church’s historic role in supplying North Central with students and financial support.

Roger Hruby

Roger Hruby
Roger Hruby graduated with a degree in chemistry from North Central College, a liberal arts college in Naperville, Illinois.

How many of the scientists who have shaped our world can you identify? Here’s a few — all Nobel laureates: Harold Varmus. John Mather. Peter Agre. And their schools? Small liberal arts colleges.

Scientist Honored with Outstanding Alumnus Award

K. Darrell Berlin ’55, a distinguished scientist, inventor and author, was recognized with an Outstanding Alumni Award at the Homecoming awards ceremony. A cancer researcher, Berlin is the first Regents Professor named at Oklahoma State University (OSU). He is also a special consultant to the National Institutes of Health.

Student Finds Big Adventures at a Small College

How do you combine French and chemistry with forensics, flute and community service? Sarah Brady '08 found the answer at North Central College.

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