North Central College - Naperville, IL

Theatre Courses

NOTE: This page contains all of the regular course descriptions for this discipline or program. Academic credit for each course is noted in parenthesis after the course title. Prerequisites (if any) and the general education requirements, both Core and All-College Requirements (ACRs), which each course fulfills (if any) are noted following each course description. Not all courses are offered every year. Check Merlin, our searchable course schedule, to see which courses are being offered in upcoming terms.

THE 100 Script Analysis (3.00)
This course focuses on reading a script as the basic element in theatre. Through a careful examination of a variety of plays from different periods, a pattern emerges for discerning what options exist for interpreting a script. Students read from classic and contemporary theatre, engage in class discussions, and write analysis of the chosen plays. Students gain practical knowledge useful for actors, directors, and designers.

THE 101 Introduction to Acting (3.00)
Specifically designed for students with little to no stage experience, this course emphasizes the development of the actor's instruments through warm-ups, games, improvisations, scenes, and monologues. By helping students to overcome stage fright and become more at ease with facing crowds, and by making students more informed observers of the theatrical experience as a whole, this course is highly beneficial to non-majors, as well as to beginning actors.

THE 115 Theatre Practicum I (0.00-1.00)
Theatre is studied through the staging, mounting, and production of a faculty-directed, all-College theatrical production. This course is repeatable up to a maximum of six credit hours earned. Students are expected to take this course for credit unless exceeding 12 credit hours in a term. May register for 0.00 or 1.00 hours. Instructor consent required.

THE 116 Theatre Practicum II (0.00-2.00)
Theatre is studied through the staging, mounting, and production of a faculty-directed, all-College theatrical production. Students must hold major performance roles or take on major production positions to enroll. This course is repeatable up to a maximum of four credit hours earned. Students are expected to take this course for credit unless they will exceed 12 hours in the term. May register for 0.00 or 2.00 hours. Instructor consent required.

THE 145 Musical Theatre Dance I (1.50)
An introductory course in jazz, ballet, and tap techniques for the stage. The course includes instruction in the history and theory of musical theatre, dance, and the basic building blocks of choreography. This course assumes no prior dance experience and is open to all students interested in dance training for performance. This course may be repeated for credit once. Same as: HPE 145.

THE 175 Introduction to Theatre Arts (3.00)
A comprehensive overview of the process of creating theatre productions, this course explores theatre through criticism, history, design, and aesthetic principles. Core: Humanities.

THE 180 Stagecraft (3.00)
Stagecraft incorporates fundament skills that are required to move a scenic design from inception to construction and completion. In this course, students will gain knowledge of basic construction and painting techniques for stage scenery. Tool use and stage/shop equipment will be mastered along with the safety rules that are mandatory for running an effective scenic shop.

THE 182 Fundamentals of Acting (3.00)
Designed for students with previous acting experience, including high school and/or community theatre, this course consists of exercises in voice, movement, improvisation, and text study. The course seeks to give the student an awareness of what acting is in both theory and performance. Presentation of scenes and attendance at productions are required.

THE 185 Fundementals of Theatrical Design (3.00)
This course covers the fundamentals of the process of designing for the theater. Students will work on developing a fully realized design from the initial textual analysis through the collaborative process of working with the director and other designers. Students will explore basic theories and design principles including script analysis, research methodology, conceptual development, color theory, balance and proportion, visual composition, and other elements of design. Students will also learn practical skills including drawing techniques, figure drawing, drafting, and modeling.

THE 190 Stage Management (3.00)
This course serves as an introduction to the administrative work of the stage manager, while exploring the relationship between the artistry and execution of producing plays and musicals. Students will study production protocols, create a prompt book, and learn the forms and formats needed to maintain professional standards while working with directors, actors, and the technical crew.

THE 207 Musical Theatre Workshop I (0.00-1.00)
The relationships of music and drama studied through the staging, mounting, and production of an all-College musical. This course is repeatable up to a maximum of six credit hours. Students are expected to take this course for credit unless they will exceed 12 hours in the term. May register for 0.00 or 1.00 hours. Instructor consent required.

THE 208 Musical Theatre Workshop II (0.00-2.00)
The relationship of music and drama studied through the staging, mounting, and production of an all-College musical. Students must hold major performance roles or take on major production positions to enroll. This course is repeatable up to a maximum of four credit hours. Students are expected to take this course for credit unless they will exceed 12 hours in the term. May be taken for 0.00 or 2.00 hours. Instructor consent required.

THE 221 Voice Lessons: Musical Theatre (0.00-1.00)
Available to all students. May be repeated.

THE 240 Voice and Movement (3.00)
This class focuses on the human voice and body as an instrument of communication both on stage and in everyday life. The course seeks to give the student an understanding of voice and movement and their use as expressive tools for the performance.

THE 245 Musical Theatre Dance II (1.50)
An extension of Musical Theatre Dance I. This course has its emphasis in jazz, tap, and ballet techniques as applied to musical theatre at an intermediate level. This course also covers choreography in jazz and tap and auditioning techniques. This course may be repeated once for credit. Same as: HPE 145.

THE 246 Jazz Dance (0.00-1.50)
A concentration on jazz dance from an historical, theoretical, and performance perspective. This course builds and expands upon the jazz dance portion of THE 245. Repeatable course. Same as: HPE 246. May be taken for 0.00 or 1.50 hours.

THE 248 Tap Dance (0.00-1.50)
A concentration on tap dance from an historical, theoretical, and performance perspective. This course builds and expands upon the tap dance portion of THE 245. Repeatable course. Same as: HPE 248. May be taken for 0.00 or 1.50 hours.

THE 252 Ballet (0.00-1.50)
A concentration on ballet from an historical, theoretical, and performance perspective. This course builds and expands upon the ballet portion of THE 245. Repeatable course. Same as: HPE 252. May be taken for 0.00 or 1.50 hours.

THE 254 Choreography (1.50)
A choreography workshop that explores the technique and skills required to create dance and movement for the stage. The course explores methods of approaching various types of work, from musical staging to dance numbers. Repeatable course. Same as: HPE 254.

THE 255 Theatrical Makeup (3.00)
An introduction to the principles and techniques of theatrical makeup design and application.

THE 257 Dance History (3.00)
A study of the history of Western theatrical dance from the first court ballets in the late 16th century through early 21st century Postmodernism. The course explores the dances, choreographers, dancers, and theories in the cultural context of each period. Core: Humanities.

THE 265 American Musical Theatre (3.00)
A study of the American musical theatre from the 19th century to present. Composers and librettists covered include George M. Cohan, Victor Herbert, Jerome Kerr, Rodgers and Hammerstein, and Stephen Sondheim. Field trip to an area production is required. Core: Humanities.

THE 270 Directing (3.00)
The course serves as an introduction to the art of directing plays for the theatre. It utilizes background information and experience with acting, stagecraft, and dramatic literature to provide the groundwork for discussion of various approaches to, and techniques of, play production. The course culminates in the public performance of student-directed short scenes and one acts.

THE 280 Stage Lighting (3.00)
A study of theatrical lighting, design, and operation in department productions.

THE 282 Contemporary Acting Styles (3.00)
This course builds on the ideas and work of THE 182. More advanced and intensive scene work is integrated with voice, movement, and textual improvisation during the term.

THE 290 Scenic Design (3.00)
The scenic designer is the person charged with the responsibility of finding the form of the physical world of the play. In order to accomplish this task, the designer must develop and call upon a number of skills. In this course students will work with some of the problems scenic designers encounter in their attempts to find and develop form, and will learn the process of developing design solutions.

THE 297 Internship (0.00-9.00)
Instructor consent required.

THE 299 Independent Study (1.00-9.00)
Instructor consent required.

THE 343 Improvisation (3.00)
This course builds on the improvisational skills introduced in THE 182. More advanced and intensive improvisational work is integrated with performance theory, research, and advanced critical thinking during the term.

THE 350 Advanced Performance Styles/Musical Theatre (3.00)
This courses examines the different vocal techniques and movement styles necessary for musical theatre. It focuses on a performer's approach to developing a song in the context of contemporary musical theatre, examining the work in terms of structure and content. This course may be taken twice for credit.

THE 352 Advanced Ballet (0.00-1.50)
This course continues the development of all beginning areas of ballet, and expands the ballet vocabulary.

THE 353 Acting on Camera (3.00)
This course explores the acting methods used for film and television. Students are trained in camera techniques used for commercial, industrial, film, and television auditions. Students work in front of the camera each week, utilizing actual copy from popular shows, commercials, and movies. Students leave this course audition ready. The course includes extensive scene memorization, class discussions, performance critique writing, and journal self-assessment writing.

THE 355 Business of Theatre (3.00)
This course explores the requirements for the business portion of theatre, from building a theatrical resume to selecting a head shot, to registering with an agent. The course includes several field trips to visit experts in specialized areas of theatrical business. The course includes establishing a small business for the actor.

THE 359 Theatre History and Literature I (3.00)
A study of the theatre and its literature from its ancient beginnings through the English Restoration. The course explores the drama, productions, theories, personages, and physical theatre in the cultural context of each period.

THE 361 Theatre History and Literature II (3.00)
A study of the theatre and its literature from the 19th century Age of Romanticism to the present day. The course explores the drama, productions, theories, personages, and physical theatre in the cultural context of each age.

THE 363 Classical Asian Theatre (3.00)
A survey of classical Asian theatre traditions, including the Noh, Kabuki, and Bunraku theatres of Japan; Beijing Opera and Yuan drama of China; Sanskrit and Kathakali dance dramas of India; Koren p'ansori dramas and mask dances; and the Balinese Dancers of Indonesia. Examination of how these performance traditions reflect each country's heritage, religion, and culture. ACR: Intercultural.

THE 382 Classical Acting Styles (3.00)
This advanced acting course offers the opportunity to explore and deepen awareness of Shakespeare's text by investigating the techniques he used in his writing which assist the actor in performing his characters and telling his stories. Students will perform sonnets, monologues, and scenes placing emphasis on the following: heightened language with believable, appropriate characterization, articulate and powerful speech, and physical vibrancy. We learn to analyze the text for rhythm, color, and the profound understanding of human character that has kept Shakespeare's plays vital for over 400 years.

THE 390 Seminar in Technical Theatre (3.00)
Advanced seminar course. Topics change yearly.

THE 393 Seminar in Theatre (3.00)
Advanced seminar course.

THE 397 Internship (0.00-9.00)
Instructor consent required.

THE 399 Independent Study (1.00-9.00)
Instructor consent required.

THE 450 Senior Musical (3.00)
This is the capstone course for Musical Theatre Majors. Graduating seniors work with the faculty advisor to select the show, divide responsibilities for production, and present a fully mounted production on the stage. ACR: Leadership, Ethics, & Values.

THE 470 Devising Theatre: Radical and Community Based Performance (3.00)
This coures explores three overlapping subfields in theatre and performance studies: devised theatre (also referred to as collective creation), radical theatre, and community-based theatre. The course begins with an exploration of the terms devised, radical, and community. The remainder of the course proceeds with a case study model; it examines a variety of ways theatre practitioners have imagined relationships between radicality, community, and performance. Students split their time equally between making performance and reading/writing about performance theory.

THE 482 Period Styles (3.00)
This course could be described as an integration of body, mind and voice techniques for the purpose of developing a way to conventionalized period acting. For the intermediate and advanced student actor, this course places primary emphasis on the development of characterization techniques, participation in physical and vocal acting exercises, and practical performance application though stylistic scene and monologue work. Period/Styles covered in this course include the following: Ancient Greek, Commedia, Restoration Comedy, and Absurdism.

THE 493 Seminar in Theatre (3.00)
Advanced seminar course.

THE 497 Internship (0.00-9.00)
Instructor consent required.

THE 499 Independent Study (1.00-9.00)
Instructor consent required.